IMWA - International Mine Water Association

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Glückauf! on the web site of the International Mine Water Association IMWA

Members of the International Mine Water Association (IMWA) share a common interest in mine water and mine drainage issues, though we arrive with different skills,backgrounds, and specialized expertise, in disciplines that range from science (e.g. chemistry, hydrogeology, microbiology, geophysics) to engineering (mostly mining and civil). Our Association has 786 members, including pragmatic consultants and mining company employees, academic researchers (faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates), and government scientists and regulators.

Our dues are low (50 € since 2013) and all dues-paying members receive our quarterly journal, Mine Water and the Environment, and discounts at all of our annual Symposia and Congresses.


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IMWA 2014
Interdisciplinary Responses to Mine Water Challenges

Xuzhou (徐州), Jiangsu Province, China (中国)
August 18 – 22 2014

Download 1st Annoucement

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ICARD IMWA 2015


Agreeing on solutions for more sustainable mine water management

Sheraton Hotel, Santiago, Chile
April 21 – 24 2015


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List of IMWA’s Corporate Members

Last Updated on Monday, 16 June 2014 09:54
 

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News Flash

Mine Water is the water that collects in both surface and underground mines. It comes from the inflow of rain or surface water and from groundwater seepage. During the active life of the mine, water is pumped out to keep the mine dry and to allow access to the ore body. Pumped water may be used in the extraction process, pumped to tailings impoundments, used for activities like dust control, or discharged as a waste. The water can be of the same quality as drinking water, or it can be very acidic and laden with high concentrations of potentially toxic elements.

(from UNEP/GRID-Arenda web site)