IMWA - International Mine Water Association

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“International Journal of Mine Water”

Volume 9, Number 1–4, 1990


PDFAuthor’s vitae

PDFBotz, M. K. & Mason, S. E. (1990): Prevention of Acid Drainage from Gold Mining in the Western United States and Impact on Water Quality. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 27-41, 5 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFXavier, A. G. (1990): Environmental-Biochemical Aspects of Heavy Metals in Acid Mine Water. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 43-55, 2 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFMiller, S. D., Jeffery, J. J. & Murray, G. S. C. (1990): Identification and Management of Acid Generating Mine Wastes - Procedures and Practices in South-East Asia and the Pacific Regions. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 57-67, 5 Abb.; Castro Verde.

PDFCarvalho, P., Richards, D. G., Fernández-Rubio, R. & Norton, P. J. (1990): Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage at Neves-Corvao Mine, Portugal. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 71-84, 6 fig.; Castro Verde.

PDFKleinmann, R. L. P. (1990): At-Source Control of Acid Mine Drainage. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 85-96, 1 fig.; Castro Verde.

PDFBagdy, I. & Sulyokm, P. (1990): Case Example on Acid-Resistent Bulkhead in Hungary. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 97-109, 7 fig.; Castro Verde.

PDFSingh, G., Bhatnagar, M. & Sinha, D. K. (1990): Environmental Management of Acid Water Problems in Ming Areas. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 113-131, 8 fig.; Castro Verde.

PDFSobek, A. A., Rastogi, V. & Benedetti, D. A. (1990): Prevention of Water Pollution Problems in Mining: The Bactericide Technology. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 133-148, 9 fig., 6 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFBosman, D. J., Clayton, J. A., Maree, J. P. & Adlem, C. J. L. (1990): Removal of Sulphate from Mine Water with Barium Sulphide. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 149-163, 5 fig., 6 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFJones, C. I. & Silva, M. F. (1990): The Treatment and Removal of Mine Water at Neves Corvo Mine. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 165-178, 4 fig., 4 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFStraskraba, V. & Moran, R. E. (1990): Environmental Occurence and Impacts of Arsenic at Gold Mining Sites in the Western United States. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 181-191, 2 fig., 1 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFDuarte, J. C., Estrada, P., Beaumont, H., Sitima, M. & Pereira, P. (1990): Biotreatment of Tailings for Metal recovery. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 193-206, 4 fig., 3 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFReal, F. & Franco, A. (1990): Tailings Disposal at Neves-Corvo Mine, Portugal. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 209-221, 4 fig., 4 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFPalmer, J. P. (1990): Reclamation and Decontamination of Metalliferous Mining Tailings. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 223-235, 2 fig., 3 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFNunes, J. F., Richards, D. G. & Gama, H. A. (1990): Mine Water and Environmental Protection - The Somincor Case. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 237-253, 5 fig., 2 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFMetcalfe, B. (1990): Establishing Long-Term Vegetational Cover on Acidic Mining Waste Tips by Utilising Consolidated Sewage Sludges. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 255-267, 4 fig., 2 tab.; Castro Verde.

PDFKleinmann, R. L. P. (1990): Acid Mine Water Treatment using Engineered Wetlands. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 269-276; Castro Verde.

PDFSammarco, O. (1990): Abandoning Mines: Hydrodynamic Evolution Controlled in Order to avoid Surface Damage. – Int. J. Mine Water, 9 (1-4): 277-289, 4 fig.; Castro Verde.

Last Updated on Thursday, 16 February 2012 12:08  

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News Flash

Mine Water is the water that collects in both surface and underground mines. It comes from the inflow of rain or surface water and from groundwater seepage. During the active life of the mine, water is pumped out to keep the mine dry and to allow access to the ore body. Pumped water may be used in the extraction process, pumped to tailings impoundments, used for activities like dust control, or discharged as a waste. The water can be of the same quality as drinking water, or it can be very acidic and laden with high concentrations of potentially toxic elements.

(from UNEP/GRID-Arenda web site)